AWEJ for Translation & Literary Studies, Volume 6, Number 4. October  2022                                Pp.162 -179
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awejtls/vol6no4.12

Full Paper PDF

Totalitarianism and Class Warfare in George Orwell’s Animal Farm 

Bechir Saoudi1
1Department of English, College of Science and Humanities in Hawtat bani Tamim, Prince
Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Zip Code: 11942, Saudi Arabia;
English Department, ISEAH, Kef, Jendouba University, Tunisia
Correspondent Author: ctat.ctat@yahoo.com 

Moudhi Al-Dossary2, Alhanof Mohammed Al-Tamimi2, Noura Saud Al-Moadi2,Asma
Mohammed Al-Tamimi
2, Shrooq  Sanad Al-Anzi2, Mariam Ebrahim Abdullah Al-Shreem2, Alanoud
Awadh Al-Otaibi
2
2Department of English, College of Science and Humanities in Hawtat bani Tamim, Prince
Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Zip Code: 11942, Saudi Arabia

 

Received: 7 /17/2022              Accepted:10 /20 /2022            Published: 10/24/2022

 

Abstract:
This article studies the struggle between classes in George Orwell’s novel Animal Farm (1945). The most suitable school of literary criticism to tackle such a subject is that of Marxism. Two basic Marxist principles are at the center of the study: class conflict and the notion of base and superstructure. The article addresses the ongoing class conflict occurring at the base between humans and pigs on the one hand and lower-class animals on the other. Three main questions have been addressed: In what ways does the upper class oppress the lower? How does the lower class respond? What is the outcome of the struggle? The study uncovers the major factors that allow the upper class to overcome the lower in Animal Farm. The lower-class response consists of both constructive and destructive attitudes. The balance is ultimately tipped towards authoritarianism, leading the animals to live in conditions worse than those of the pre-revolutionary period.
Keywords: Animal Farm, class conflict, George Orwell, Marxist criticism, totalitarianism

Cite as: Saoudi, B. , Al-Dossary,M., Al-Tamimi, A., Al-Moadi,N., Al-Tamimi, A.,   Al-Anzi, S., Al-Tamimi,M., & Al-Otaibi, A. (2022). Totalitarianism and Class Warfare in George Orwell’s Animal Farm. Arab World English Journal for
Translation & Literary Studies
6 (4) 162 -179.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awejtls/vol6no4.12

References

Dwan, D. (2012). Orwell’s Paradox: Equality in Animal Farm. ELH., 79 vols. John

Hopkins University Press. 655-83.

Fajrina, D. (2016). Character Metaphors in George Orwell’s Animal Farm. Studies in

  English Language and Education, 3(1): 79-88.

Kumar, D. (2014). Vision of Society in George Orwell’s Animal Farm. International

Journal of Research (IJR), 1(7): 89-99.

Mambrol, N. (2016). Marxism and Literary Theory. In Literariness.org. Retrieved from

Najmalddin, R. A. (2018). Animal Farm and the Nature of Revolution. BA Dissertation:

University of Halabja.

Nouasri, H. (2015). The Theme of Corruption in George Orwell’s Animal Farm. MA

Dissertation. Kasdi Merbah University, Ouatgla: Algeria.

Orwell, G. (1945). Animal Farm. Available at:

https://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks01/0100011h.html

Saoudi, B., Al-Dhafyan, D., Al-Tamimi, G., Al-Tamimi, K., Al-Shaman, N., Al-Aqili, R.,

Al-Ajmi, W. (2020). Class Conflict in Henry Fielding’s Joseph Andrews. AWEJ

for Translation & Literary Studies, 4 (3), 74-86. doi:10.31235/osf.io/n9mau

Schnitker, S. A. & Emmons, R. A. (2013). “Hegel’s Thesis-Antithesis-Synthesis Model”.

In Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions. Berlin: Springer.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Tumblr
Reddit
Email
StumbleUpon
Digg
Received: 7 /17/2022
Accepted: 10 /20 /2022
Published: 10/24/2022
http://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awejtls/vol6no4.12  

Bechir Saoudi got his Ph.D. in English Literature and Cultural Studies from the University of Manouba, Tunisia. He is currently an Assistant Professor of English literature at the English Department of the College of Science and Humanities, Hawtat bani Tamim, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. His research interests are in the literary, critical, and cultural studies domain.  ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5593-6891

The rest of the authors are graduate students of English Language and Literature at the College of Science and Humanities, Hawtat Bani Tamim, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia.

Moudhi Al-Dossary (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1253-1047)

Alhanof Mohammed Al-Tamimi (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5854-8739)

Noura Saud Al-Moadi (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1178-8273)

Asma Mohammed Al-Tamimi (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4251-2026)

Shrooq  Sanad Al-Anzi (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1178-8273)

Mariam Ebrahim Abdullah Al-Shreem (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1723-4949)

Alanoud Awadh Al-Otaibi (ORCiD: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6042-9018)