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AWEJ for Translation & Literary Studies, Volume 8, Number 1. February 2024 Pp. 227-236

The Controversy of Teaching World Literature and the Importance of Translation in The Field of English Studies

Department of English, College of Arts and Letters
Old Dominion University, United States of America

Abstract:

For literary texts to be taught in World Literature courses in the Departments of English Literature, they must be translated into English as a general rule. Some scholars advocate for translating literary texts, and others believe that translation as a methodology does not do justice to these texts. This study aims to lay out the arguments for each position and evaluate them. The significance of this study is to show that World Literature remains an essential field and to highlight the importance of translation. This study questions the modes and purpose of translating literary texts. The result of this study includes a discussion of the need for translation to promote the wide circulation of literary texts and ideas and a consideration of the positionality of critics, scholars, and readers in assessing translation. The study concludes with conducting more focus and scholarly efforts on translation techniques and methodologies.

Cite as:

Almutairi, S. (2024). The Controversy of Teaching World Literature and the Importance of Translation in The Field of English Studies Arab World English Journal for Translation & Literary Studies 8 (1): 227-236.

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Samirah Almutairi is a PhD Candidate in English from Saudi Arabia at Old Dominion University, United States of America. Her research area includes Literary and Cultural studies, Digital humanities, Postcolonial Literature, World Literature, Translation, and Caribbean Literature. She worked in Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University and Imam Mohammed Bin Saud University. She taught English Language Skills, Drama, Poetry, Advanced Writing, and Translation.
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7065-2579