AWEJ for Translation & Literary Studies, Volume 6, Number1.  February  2022                           Pp.88-103
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awejtls/vol6no1.7 

Full Paper PDF

Prismatic Identities or Authentic Selves? Elif Shafak’s Three Daughters of Eve:
A perspective of Intersectional Feminism 

Shuaa S. Al-Zahrani
Department of European Languages & Literature, Collage of Arts & Humanities,
King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Laila. M. Al-Sharqi
Department of European Languages & Literature, Collage of Arts & Humanities,
King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Corresponding Author: laila.alsharqi@gmail.com

 

Received: 10/27/2021                         Accepted:1/28/2022               Published: 2/24/2022

 

Abstract:
Elif Shafak’s novel Three Daughters of Eve(2016), questions contemporary assumptions concerning women’s status in Islam and society. This study explores Eve’s daughters—Peri, Shirin, and Mona—to investigate how gender, religion, and culture overlap and stereotypes intertwine in the novel to create unique experiences, values, beliefs, and challenges in the lives of women. This study argues that Shafak’s inclusion of these overlapping aspects provides a basis for intersectional feminist discourse as a framework for understanding the complex nature of identity and self-understanding among women in the Middle East. The results of this study contribute significantly to the existing literature by demonstrating how the three females in the novel function as distinct self-identities through which Shafak negotiates assumptions of Western society about women and Islam. The study concludes that Shafak’s work, giving voice to her women elevates aspects of diversity and inclusion by revealing the various guises of discrimination against them and illustrating how these women find ways to project their unique voices and resist oppression.
Keywords: Elif Shafak, feminism, gender, identity, intersectionality, Islam, religion, Three Daughters of Eve,

Cite as:  Al-Zahrani, S. S., & Al-Sharqi, L. M. (2022).  Prismatic Identities or Authentic Selves? Elif Shafak’s Three Daughters of Eve:

A perspective of Intersectional Feminism   . Arab World English Journal for Translation & Literary Studies 6(1) 88-103.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awejtls/vol6no1.7

References

Ahmed, L. (2011). A quiet revolution: The veil’s resurgence, from the Middle East to America. Yale University Press.

Aziz, S. F. (2012). From the oppressed to the terrorist: Muslim-American women in the crosshairs of intersectionality. Hastings, race and poverty law journal, 9(2), 191–264. http:// scholarship.law.tamu.edu/facscholar/ 100

Bădulescu, A. (2018). Eve between two worlds. Arhipelag XXI Press.

Bayat, A., & Herrera, L. (2010). Being young and Muslim: New cultural politics in the global south and north. Oxford University Press.

Carastathis, A. (2008). The invisibility of privilege: A critique of intersectional models of identity. Les ateliers de l’éthique, 3(2), 23–38. https://doi.org/10.1080/10.7202/1044594ar

Carastathis, A. (2013). Identity categories as potential coalitions. Signs, 38(4), 941–965.

Clark, S. (2007). Female subjects of international human rights law: The hijab debate and the exotic other female. Global Change Peace & Security, 19(1), 35–48. https://doi.org/10.1080/14781150601138067.

Collins, P. H. (2015). Intersectionality’s definitional dilemmas. Annual Review of Sociology, 41(1), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-soc-073014-112142

Collins, P. H., & Bilge, S. (2016). Intersectionality. (p. 158). Polity Press.

Crenshaw, K. (1989). Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A black feminist critique of antidiscrimination doctrine, feminist theory and antiracist politics. The University of Chicago Legal Forum, 140(1), 139–167. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429500480-5

Hooks, B. (1982). Ain’t I a woman: Black Women and Feminism. United Kingdom: Pluto Press.

Ibn Manzoūr, Muhammad Ibn Mukarram. (1312). Lisan al-Arab. Bayrut: Dar Sadir.

Lopez, A. B., Huynh, V. W., & Fuligni, A. J. (2011). A longitudinal study of religious identity and participation during adolescence. Child Development, 82(4), 1297–1309. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01609.x

Mirza, H. S. (2012). A second skin’: Embodied intersectionality, transnationalism and narratives of identity and belonging among Muslim women in Britain. Women’s Studies International Forum, 36 (1), 5–15.

Nihad, M. (2019). Elif Shafak: The voice of the other. Opcion, 21, 2900–2913.

Oswald, D. L., Franzoi, S. L., & Frost, K. A. (2013). Experiencing sexism and young women’s body esteem. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 31(10), 1112–1137. https://doi.org/10.1521/jscp.2012.31.10.1112

Razack, S. (2004). Imperiled Muslim women, dangerous Muslim men, and civilized Europeans: Legal and social responses to forced marriages. Feminist legal studies, 12, 129–174. https://doi.org/10.1023/B:FEST.0000043305.66172.92

Ridgeon, L. (2017). Ahmed Kasravi and “Pick-Axe Politics”: Neckties and literature as western tools of cultural imperialism. Journal of the British Institute of Persian Studies, 54(1), 59–72. https://doi.org/10.1080/05786967.2016.11882301

Sadeghi, F. (2008). Negotiating with modernity: Young women and sexuality in Iran. Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 28(2), 250–259. https://doi.org/10.1215/1089201x-2008-003

Sârbu, S., & Kosa, M. (2019). The figure of the seducer in Elif Shafak’s Three Daughters of Eve. InterCulturalia 2018, 149.

Shafak, E. (2016). Three Daughters of Eve (p. 212). United Kingdom: Penguin.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Tumblr
Reddit
Email
StumbleUpon
Digg
Received: 10/27/2021 
Accepted: 1/28/2022 
Published: 2/24/2022
http://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awejtls/vol6no1.7 

Shua’a Alzahrani is an English instructor at Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Saudi Arabia. She received her MA from the Department of European Languages and Literature at King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia in 2020. Her research interests are in the area of postmodern literature, women studies, and the representation of middle eastern women in literature.ORCID ID. https://orcid.org/0000-000 -9520-488X

Laila Mohammed Al-Sharqi is an associate professor of English in the Department of European Languages and Literature at King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Studies from the University of Nottingham. Her research interests include postmodern literature, literary theory, gender studies. “Magical realism as a feminist discourse in Raja Alem’s Fatma” and “Twitter Fiction: A new creative literary landscape” are examples of her research. ORCID ID. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8142-1525